CBD For Skin Care: The Evidence

Is it just me or has there been a real buzz around CBD this week? I feel like I’ve seen loads of articles popping up about CBD in skin care which is so great for all of us in the movement. It also means that hopefully there’ll be a whole new wave of people interested in using CBD which is amazing! If you are new to CBD, welcome! It really has changed my life for the better and I hope that you too will soon be feeling its positive effects.


I’m sure that those of you who’ve been using CBD for a long time know all about the evidence behind how it works, but for all the newcomers I wanted to share a bit of the key evidence behind the use of CBD in skin care and also give some advice on what to look out for when buying a CBD skin care product.


One of the studies that I think is really important is one conducted at the University of Sydney in partnership with MGC Pharmaceuticals in 2016. The study came back supportive of the use of CBD as an anti-inflammatory to treat chronic pain, post-chemotherapy nausea, epilepsy and multiple sclerosis, and as an antioxidant to protect skin cells from oxidative stress and help combat the appearance of fine lines and premature ageing. This is so fantastic it makes such a strong case for the application of CBD within the realm of skin care.


Another study that I’d like to share was published a little further back by the Journal of Clinical Investigation in 2014. It was one of the earlier comprehensive studies that showed how CBD could be used as a treatment for acne as it regulates the skin's natural production of sebum, which causes excessive oiliness, and further established the potential of CBD in skin care.


With hard evidence that CBD can be used as a treatment for pain, inflammation and excessive oiliness, it is logical for to be included as a natural active ingredient within the world of skin care. As we are in 2019 now there are many more recent studies that support CBD for use in skin care, and I hope the new wave of media attention will lead to even more being done, but I think it is so important to acknowledge that real scientific proof has been available for years. It adds to all the thousands of anecdotal stories about positive CBD experiences that people from all around the world have been sharing for years and hopefully the concrete scientific evidence can bring people who may have previously been on the fence into the CBD movement.


A third study that I think is important to be aware of is one published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in 2017 which found widespread mislabelling of CBD products. I’m sure that people who have been using CBD skin care products for a long time will know which time-tested brands to opt for, but with new CBD ranges popping up everyday I can understand how a newcomer to the scene may make a wrong choice by mistake.


The problem is that because cannabis-derived products are currently unregulated, you can’t always be sure that the CBD used is pure enough, even though it might say so on the label. The best way to get around this is to contact the company directly. They should be able to provide you with a confirmation that the CBD inside is of the highest purity so you can get the best results. If they can’t, then move on until you find a brand that you can really put your faith into, as it is so important that you completely trust what you are choosing to bring into contact with your body.